Dec 27, 18: #AnalyticsClub #Newsletter (Events, Tips, News & more..)

[  COVER OF THE WEEK ]

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Data shortage  Source

[ LOCAL EVENTS & SESSIONS]

More WEB events? Click Here

[ AnalyticsWeek BYTES]

>> Large Visualizations in canvasXpress by analyticsweek

>> How to pick the right sample for your analysis by jburchell

>> How Google Understands You [Infographic] by v1shal

Wanna write? Click Here

[ NEWS BYTES]

>>
 Meet data center compliance standards in hybrid deployments – TechTarget Under  Data Center

>>
 Approaching The Hybrid Cloud Computing Model For Modern Government – Forbes Under  Cloud

>>
 Financial Analytics Market 2018 Report with Manufacturers, Dealers, Consumers, Revenue, Regions, Types, Application – The Iowa DeltaChi Under  Financial Analytics

More NEWS ? Click Here

[ FEATURED COURSE]

Introduction to Apache Spark

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Learn the fundamentals and architecture of Apache Spark, the leading cluster-computing framework among professionals…. more

[ FEATURED READ]

Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future

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What are the jobs of the future? How many will there be? And who will have them? As technology continues to accelerate and machines begin taking care of themselves, fewer people will be necessary. Artificial intelligence… more

[ TIPS & TRICKS OF THE WEEK]

Keeping Biases Checked during the last mile of decision making
Today a data driven leader, a data scientist or a data driven expert is always put to test by helping his team solve a problem using his skills and expertise. Believe it or not but a part of that decision tree is derived from the intuition that adds a bias in our judgement that makes the suggestions tainted. Most skilled professionals do understand and handle the biases well, but in few cases, we give into tiny traps and could find ourselves trapped in those biases which impairs the judgement. So, it is important that we keep the intuition bias in check when working on a data problem.

[ DATA SCIENCE Q&A]

Q:How do you assess the statistical significance of an insight?
A: * is this insight just observed by chance or is it a real insight?
Statistical significance can be accessed using hypothesis testing:
– Stating a null hypothesis which is usually the opposite of what we wish to test (classifiers A and B perform equivalently, Treatment A is equal of treatment B)
– Then, we choose a suitable statistical test and statistics used to reject the null hypothesis
– Also, we choose a critical region for the statistics to lie in that is extreme enough for the null hypothesis to be rejected (p-value)
– We calculate the observed test statistics from the data and check whether it lies in the critical region

Common tests:
– One sample Z test
– Two-sample Z test
– One sample t-test
– paired t-test
– Two sample pooled equal variances t-test
– Two sample unpooled unequal variances t-test and unequal sample sizes (Welch’s t-test)
– Chi-squared test for variances
– Chi-squared test for goodness of fit
– Anova (for instance: are the two regression models equals? F-test)
– Regression F-test (i.e: is at least one of the predictor useful in predicting the response?)

Source

[ VIDEO OF THE WEEK]

#FutureOfData with Rob(@telerob) / @ConnellyAgency on running innovation in agency

 #FutureOfData with Rob(@telerob) / @ConnellyAgency on running innovation in agency

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[ QUOTE OF THE WEEK]

War is 90% information. – Napoleon Bonaparte

[ PODCAST OF THE WEEK]

Scott Harrison (@SRHarrisonJD) on leading the learning organization #JobsOfFuture #Podcast

 Scott Harrison (@SRHarrisonJD) on leading the learning organization #JobsOfFuture #Podcast

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[ FACT OF THE WEEK]

Estimates suggest that by better integrating big data, healthcare could save as much as $300 billion a year — that’s equal to reducing costs by $1000 a year for every man, woman, and child.

Sourced from: Analytics.CLUB #WEB Newsletter

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