The 3 Step Guide CIO’s Need to Build a Data-Driven Culture

Today’s CIO has more data available than ever before. There is an opportunity for potential big improvements in decision-making outcomes, it carries huge complexity and responsibility in getting it right.

Many have already got it wrong and this is largely in part down to organisational culture. At the centre of creating a successful analytics strategy is building a data-driven culture.

According to a report by Gartner more than 35% of the top 5,000 global companies will fail to make use of the insight driven from their data. In another report by Eckerson, just 36% of the respondents gave their BI program a grade of ‘Excellent’ or ’Good’.

With the wealth of data already available in the world and the promise that it will continue to grow at an exponential rate, it seems inevitable that organisations attempt to leverage this resource to its fullest to improve their decision-making capabilities.

Before we move forward, it’s important to state that underpinning the success of these steps is to ensure all employees who have a direct involvement with the data or the insight generated are able to contribute. This point is highlighted in a case study of Warby Parker who illustrate the importance of utilising self-service technologies that help all users meet their own data needs, which, according to Carl Anderson, the director of Data Science, is essential in realising a data-driven culture.

Set Realistic Goals

I suppose this step is generic and best practice across all aspects of an organisation. However, I felt it needed to be mentioned because there are a number of examples available where decision-makers have become disillusioned with their analytics program due to it not delivering what they had expected.

Therefore, CIO’s should take the time to prepare in-depth research into their organisation; I recommend they look at current and future challenges facing their organisation and tailor their analytics strategy appropriately around solving these.

During this process, it is important to have a full understanding of the data sources currently used for analysis and reporting by the organisation as well as considering the external data sources available to the organisation that are not yet utilised.

By performing extensive research and gaining understanding on the data sources available to the organisation, it will be easier for CIO’s to set realistic and clear goals that address the challenges facing the business. Though there is still work to be done addressing how the analytics strategy will go about achieving these goals, it’s at this point where CIO’s need to get creative with the data available to them.

For example, big data has brought with it a wealth of unstructured data and many analysts believe that tapping into this unstructured data is paramount to obtaining a competitive advantage in the years to come. However it appears to be something that most will not realise any time soon as according to recent studies estimate that only around 0.5% percentage of unstructured data is analysed in the world.

Build the Right Infrastructure

Once the plan has been formulated, the next step for CIO’s is to ensure that their organisation’s IT infrastructure is aligned with the strategy so that the set goals can be achieved.

There is no universal “one way works for all” solution on building the right infrastructure; the most important factor to consider is whether the IT infrastructure can work according to the devised strategy.

A key requirement and expectation underpinning all good, modern infrastructures is the capability to integrate all of the data sources in the organisation into one central repository. The benefit being that by combining all of the data sources it provides users with a fully holistic view of the entire organisation.

For example, in a data environment where all of the organisation’s data is stored in silo, analysts may identify a trend or correlation in one data source but not have the full perspective afforded if the data were unified, i.e. what can our other data sources tell us about what has contributed to this correlation?

Legacy technologies that are now obsolete should be replaced in favour of more modern approaches to processing, storing and analysing data – one example are those technologies built on search-engine technology, as cited by Gartner.

Enable Front-Line Employees and Other Business Users

Imperative to succeeding now is ensuring that front-line employees (those whose job roles can directly benefit by having access to data) and other business users (managers, key business executives, etc.) are capable of self-serving their own data needs.

CIO’s should look to acquire a solution built specifically for self-service analysis over large-volumes of data and capable of seamless integration with their IT infrastructure.

A full analysis of employee skill-set and mind-set should be undertaken to determine whether certain employees need training in particular areas to bolster their knowledge or simply need to adapt their mind-set to a more analytical one.

Whilst it is essential that the front-line employees and other business users are given access to self-service analysis, inherently they will likely be “less-technical users”. Therefore ensuring they have the right access to training and other learning tools is vital to guarantee that they don’t become frustrated or disheartened.

By investing in employee development in these areas now, it will save time and money further down the line, removing an over reliance on both internal and external IT experts.

Source: The 3 Step Guide CIO’s Need to Build a Data-Driven Culture

Nov 08, 18: #AnalyticsClub #Newsletter (Events, Tips, News & more..)

[  COVER OF THE WEEK ]

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Data shortage  Source

[ LOCAL EVENTS & SESSIONS]

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Deep Learning Prerequisites: The Numpy Stack in Python

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The Numpy, Scipy, Pandas, and Matplotlib stack: prep for deep learning, machine learning, and artificial intelligence… more

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Data Science for Business: What You Need to Know about Data Mining and Data-Analytic Thinking

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Written by renowned data science experts Foster Provost and Tom Fawcett, Data Science for Business introduces the fundamental principles of data science, and walks you through the “data-analytic thinking” necessary for e… more

[ TIPS & TRICKS OF THE WEEK]

Fix the Culture, spread awareness to get awareness
Adoption of analytics tools and capabilities has not yet caught up to industry standards. Talent has always been the bottleneck towards achieving the comparative enterprise adoption. One of the primal reason is lack of understanding and knowledge within the stakeholders. To facilitate wider adoption, data analytics leaders, users, and community members needs to step up to create awareness within the organization. An aware organization goes a long way in helping get quick buy-ins and better funding which ultimately leads to faster adoption. So be the voice that you want to hear from leadership.

[ DATA SCIENCE Q&A]

Q:What is your definition of big data?
A: Big data is high volume, high velocity and/or high variety information assets that require new forms of processing
– Volume: big data doesn’t sample, just observes and tracks what happens
– Velocity: big data is often available in real-time
– Variety: big data comes from texts, images, audio, video…

Difference big data/business intelligence:
– Business intelligence uses descriptive statistics with data with high density information to measure things, detect trends etc.
– Big data uses inductive statistics (statistical inference) and concepts from non-linear system identification to infer laws (regression, classification, clustering) from large data sets with low density information to reveal relationships and dependencies or to perform prediction of outcomes or behaviors

Source

[ VIDEO OF THE WEEK]

@BrianHaugli @The_Hanover ?on Building a #Leadership #Security #Mindset #FutureOfData #Podcast

 @BrianHaugli @The_Hanover ?on Building a #Leadership #Security #Mindset #FutureOfData #Podcast

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[ QUOTE OF THE WEEK]

If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough. – Albert Einstein

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#BigData @AnalyticsWeek #FutureOfData #Podcast with @MPFlowersNYC, @enigma_data

 #BigData @AnalyticsWeek #FutureOfData #Podcast with @MPFlowersNYC, @enigma_data

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[ FACT OF THE WEEK]

140,000 to 190,000. Too few people with deep analytical skills to fill the demand of Big Data jobs in the U.S. by 2018.

Sourced from: Analytics.CLUB #WEB Newsletter

Using sparklyr with Microsoft R Server

The sparklyr package (by RStudio) provides a high-level interface between R and Apache Spark. Among many other things, it allows you to filter and aggregate data in Spark using the dplyr syntax. In Microsoft R Server 9.1, you can now connect to a a Spark session using the sparklyr package as the interface, allowing you to combine the data-preparation capabilities of sparklyr and the data-analysis capabilities of Microsoft R Server in the same environment.

In a presentation by at the Spark Summit (embedded below, and you can find the slides here), Ali Zaidi shows how to connect to a Spark session from Microsoft R Server, and use the sparklyr package to extract a data set. He then shows how to build predictive models on this data (specifically, a deep Neural Network and a Boosted Trees classifier). He also shows how to build general ensemble models, cross-validate hyper-parameters in parallel, and even gives a preview of forthcoming streaming analysis capabilities.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-xvKlz26vg?rel=0&w=500&h=281]

Any easy way to try out these capabilities is with Azure HDInsight 3.6, which provides a managed Spark 2.1 instance with Microsoft R Server 9.1.

Spark Summit: Extending the R API for Spark with sparklyr and Microsoft R Server

Originally Posted at: Using sparklyr with Microsoft R Server

Nov 01, 18: #AnalyticsClub #Newsletter (Events, Tips, News & more..)

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Accuracy check  Source

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>> The User Experience of State Government Websites by analyticsweek

>> Marginal gains: the rise of data analytics in sport by analyticsweekpick

>> The Pitfalls of Using Predictive Models by bobehayes

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[ NEWS BYTES]

>>
 How to Avoid the Trap of Fragmented Security Analytics – Security Intelligence (blog) Under  Analytics

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 Are You Spending Too Much (or Too Little) on Cybersecurity? – Data Center Knowledge Under  Data Center

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 Most UK businesses are not insured against security breaches and data loss, says study – Information Age Under  Data Security

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Python for Beginners with Examples

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Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies

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The human brain has some capabilities that the brains of other animals lack. It is to these distinctive capabilities that our species owes its dominant position. Other animals have stronger muscles or sharper claws, but … more

[ TIPS & TRICKS OF THE WEEK]

Keeping Biases Checked during the last mile of decision making
Today a data driven leader, a data scientist or a data driven expert is always put to test by helping his team solve a problem using his skills and expertise. Believe it or not but a part of that decision tree is derived from the intuition that adds a bias in our judgement that makes the suggestions tainted. Most skilled professionals do understand and handle the biases well, but in few cases, we give into tiny traps and could find ourselves trapped in those biases which impairs the judgement. So, it is important that we keep the intuition bias in check when working on a data problem.

[ DATA SCIENCE Q&A]

Q:You have data on the durations of calls to a call center. Generate a plan for how you would code and analyze these data. Explain a plausible scenario for what the distribution of these durations might look like. How could you test, even graphically, whether your expectations are borne out?
A: 1. Exploratory data analysis
* Histogram of durations
* histogram of durations per service type, per day of week, per hours of day (durations can be systematically longer from 10am to 1pm for instance), per employee…
2. Distribution: lognormal?

3. Test graphically with QQ plot: sample quantiles of log(durations)log?(durations) Vs normal quantiles

Source

[ VIDEO OF THE WEEK]

@AnalyticsWeek #FutureOfData with Robin Thottungal(@rathottungal), Chief Data Scientist at @EPA

 @AnalyticsWeek #FutureOfData with Robin Thottungal(@rathottungal), Chief Data Scientist at @EPA

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[ QUOTE OF THE WEEK]

Everybody gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense. – Gertrude Stein

[ PODCAST OF THE WEEK]

Solving #FutureOfOrgs with #Detonate mindset (by @steven_goldbach & @geofftuff) #FutureOfData #Podcast

 Solving #FutureOfOrgs with #Detonate mindset (by @steven_goldbach & @geofftuff) #FutureOfData #Podcast

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[ FACT OF THE WEEK]

Brands and organizations on Facebook receive 34,722 Likes every minute of the day.

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@DrJasonBrooks talked about the Fabric and Future of Leadership #JobsOfFuture #Podcast

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SB29nSaCppU]

In this podcast Jason talked about the fabric of a great transformative leadership. He shared some tactical steps that current leadership could follow to ensure their relevance and their association with transformative teams. Jason emphasized the role of team, leader and organization in create a healthy future proof culture. It is a good session for the leadership of tomorrow.

Jason’s Recommended Read:
Reset: Reformatting Your Purpose for Tomorrow’s World by Jason Brooks https://amzn.to/2rAuywh
Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown https://amzn.to/2jOX8Xi

Podcast Link:
iTunes: http://math.im/itunes
GooglePlay: http://math.im/gplay

Jason’s BIO:
Dr. Jason Brooks is an executive, entrepreneur, consulting and leadership psychologist, bestselling author, and speaker with over 24 years of demonstrated results in the design, implementation and evaluation of leadership and organizational development, organizational effectiveness, and human capital management solutions, He work to grow leaders and enhance workforce performance and overall individual and company success. He is a results-oriented, high-impact executive leader with experience in start-up, high-growth, and operationally mature multi-million and multi-billion dollar companies in multiple industries.

About #Podcast:
#JobsOfFuture podcast is a conversation starter to bring leaders, influencers and lead practitioners to come on show and discuss their journey in creating the data driven future.

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Source: @DrJasonBrooks talked about the Fabric and Future of Leadership #JobsOfFuture #Podcast by v1shal